PatrickSwindale

Patrick Swindale’s 3 Tips to Start Weight Lifting in 2020

On January 1st, thousands of people around the world resolved to be healthier in 2020. If you’re among them, one of the best ways to get in shape is to take up weight lifting. Strength training exercises, including weight lifting, can build muscle mass which results in more efficient fat-burning and higher metabolism, as well as a leaner physique and greater strength and endurance. It may also reduce stress, among other benefits. Patrick Swindale, an athlete and weight lifter, offers three tips to help you get started. 

3 Tips to Start Weight Lifting 

 

  1. Start Slow
    Two of the most common mistakes people make when it comes to getting in shape is going too fast or expecting results to come quickly. Patrick Swindale says strength training is more like a marathon than a sprint. Start off slow and acclimate yourself to the equipment and your routine. You won’t start lifting heavy right off the bat. If you lift heavier than you are prepared for, you may risk serious injury. Ideally, Patrick Swindale says, you should lift between three and five days per week. But you may need to start off twice a week for the first two or three weeks, lifting for about 20 to 30 minutes at a time. After that, you may increase your intensity and frequency. Likewise, realize you will not see results immediately. Rather, with consistent hard work, you can expect to see improvement within a few weeks.

 

  1. Warm-Up

Patrick Swindale says you should always warm-up before exercise, but particularly before strenuous activities like weightlifting or intense cardio. Start off with 10 or 15 minutes of stretching. A foam roller is a great way to massage tight muscles and relieve tension from previous workouts. You can also use the foam roller after lifting to relieve pain. In addition, you may want to walk for 10 minutes on the treadmill to get your blood pumping. Avoid intense cardio, however, as this can drain your energy before your lifting session.

 

  1. Do 3 Sets of 15

When you are starting off with weight lifting, Patrick Swindale suggests doing three sets of 15 reps each on each exercise. You should begin with a weight that is challenging but which does not push you to your limit. Once you are more experienced, you can start off with practice reps, usually two or three sets of 10 at a very low weight, followed by five sets of five reps at your maximum or near-maximum capacity. This is the most effective way to build muscle mass, combined with a nutritious diet. 

More on Patrick Swindale 

Patrick Swindale works full-time as an engineer at HMS Global Maritime, Inc. and maintains a 4.0 grade-point average at the Loeb School for International Business at Maine Maritime Academy. When Patrick Swindale is not at work or in class, he spends time with his family and takes his autistic brother, of whom he is a legal guardian, to the gym or hiking five days a week. 

An Eagle Scout and former assistant scoutmaster, Patrick Swindale is community-minded and spends his remaining hours giving back. He assists with his old Scout group and local charity efforts and has participated in St. John Bosco Youth Group and Knights of Columbus and is a regular speaker at his church. In college, he was also involved in Kappa Sigma and Alpha Phi Sigma.

“I carry myself with passion for whatever job I’m committed to,” Patrick Swindale said.

Patrick Swindale

Financial Expert Patrick Swindale Offers 3 Tips for a Budget-Savvy 2020

The new year for many means more than flipping the page on a calendar. It’s the start of new beginnings and the chance to lead a better life, whether professionally, personally, or otherwise. Patrick Swindale, who is pursuing his Masters of Science in International Logistics Management, says it is the ideal opportunity to get ahold of your financial future. With many Americans in debt, particularly Millennials and Gen Z, he has a vested interest in helping others establish solid financial footing and plan for a more stable tomorrow. Here are his top tips.

3 Tips to Revamp Your Finances in 2020

1. Repay Credit Card Debt
According to WalletHub, Americans on average owe more than $1 trillion, or $8,700 average per household, in credit card debt. Unfortunately, many people turn to credit cards to finance purchases when they can’t make ends meet with their income, an all-too-common problem. But while financing with credit cards can be convenient and even sometimes necessary for emergencies or other unexpected circumstances, it is quite expensive with interest rates often around 30% APR. Patrick Swindale recommends making a resolution to pay off 20% of your credit card debt in the next year by utilizing principles like those outlined by Forbes*. Doing so will not only take a weight off your shoulders but can up your credit score and save you significant money in the long-run by allowing you to avoid costly interest.

2. Make an Emergency Fund
No one wants to think about the worst-case scenario, but as Patrick Swindale learned in Boy Scouts, in life it is always best to be prepared. As a rule of thumb, everyone should have at least one month’s pay squirreled away as an emergency fund. If you can’t put all of that away at once save as much as you can from each paycheck. Take an honest, thorough look at your expenses and see where you can cut down, Patrick Swindale advises. You may be surprised how much little things, like groceries, gas, or nights out on the town, can add up.

3. Make a Budget and Stick to It
Finally, perhaps the most essential tip, Patrick Swindale says, is to make a realistic budget and stick to it. Determine how much money you’re bringing in and how much you are spending on everything, from food and housing to transportation and entertainment. For most people, there will be clear areas where you’re spending a bit more than you need to be. For example, you may consider using the bus or riding your bike to work instead of always driving your car. Or, you might skip the daily drive-through coffees and make your cup at home. Find some useful budgeting tips here* to get started.

Patrick Swindale

More on Patrick Swindale

Patrick Swindale works full-time as an engineer at HMS Global Maritime, Inc. and maintains a 4.0 grade-point average at the Loeb School for International Business at Maine Maritime Academy. When Patrick Swindale is not at work or in class, he spends time with his family and takes his autistic brother, of whom he is a legal guardian, to the gym or hiking five days a week.

An Eagle Scout and former assistant scoutmaster, Patrick Swindale is community-minded and spends his remaining hours giving back. He assists with his old Scout group and local charity efforts and has participated in St. John Bosco Youth Group and Knights of Columbus and is a regular speaker at his church. In college, he was also involved in Kappa Sigma and Alpha Phi Sigma.

“I carry myself with passion for whatever job I’m committed to,” Patrick Swindale said.

Forbes* – https://www.forbes.com/sites/zackfriedman/2018/05/21/pay-off-credit-card-debt-faster/
budgeting tips here* – https://www.daveramsey.com/blog/the-truth-about-budgeting

3 Reasons to Enroll Your Child in Boy Scouts According to Patrick Swindale

Patrick Swindale

For over a century, the Boy Scouts has been an integral part of many young men’s lives. More than an extracurricular activity or hobby, it can be a life-changing experience that impacts kids and teens well after their Scouting days have passed. From Cub Scouts to Eagle, boys become men as they progress through the ranks, and many graduate with a hearty sense of self-confidence and civic duty. Patrick Swindale is one exemplary example of the positive impact the Boy Scouts can have on a young man’s personal growth and character development. Here, he explains three reasons to consider enrolling your child in Scouts.

3 Benefits of Boy Scouts

Develops Good Citizens
The Boy Scouts are a community-oriented organization with faith-based principles. Many of the lessons boys learn, Patrick Swindale explained, are aimed at making them good citizens of their community and the world. This includes teaching participants how to make ethical decisions and to behave respectfully toward other people and the earth. Community service projects are a key part of the Boy Scouts experience and participants often take part in various events, from volunteering at soup kitchens to picking up litter.

Life Skills
The Boy Scouts also provide an array of life skills Scouts can use well after they’ve earned their final patches. This includes basic outdoor skills, such as how to pitch a tent, start a campfire, and fish, as well as first aid. Scouts also learn the importance of independence as well as teamwork and how to get along with others. In addition, they’ll develop leadership skills and confidence.

Goal Orientation
Scouts earn patches and badges through achieving certain goals, whether it’s learning a new skill or completing a project. The same principle is applied to how children progress through the ranks from Cub to Eagle. These processes help Scouts learn to set and achieve goals. Boys also learn how to overcome challenges on the way to success. This is another skill they can use for life.

More on Patrick Swindale

Patrick Swindale works full-time as an engineer at HMS Global Maritime, Inc. and maintains a 4.0 grade-point average at the Loeb School for International Business at Maine Maritime Academy where he is studying for his Masters of Science in International Logistics Management. When Patrick Swindale is not at work or in class, he spends time with his family and takes his autistic brother, of whom he is a legal guardian, to the gym or hiking five days a week.

An Eagle Scout and former assistant Scoutmaster, Patrick Swindale is community-minded and spends his remaining hours giving back. He assists with his old Scout group and local charity efforts and has participated in St. John Bosco Youth Group and Knights of Columbus and is a regular speaker at his church. In college, he was also involved in Kappa Sigma and Alpha Phi Sigma.

“I carry myself with passion for whatever job I’m committed to,” Patrick Swindale said.

Patrick Swindale’s Top 3 Tips to Avoid Breaking the Bank this Holiday Season

Patrick Swindale

With the holiday season in full swing, many people are bracing themselves and their bank accounts for the inevitable impact. While it may be impossible to avoid spending this December engaging in holiday festivities, there’s no reason to start the new year in the red. Patrick Swindale, an honors student at the Loeb School for International Business at Maine Maritime Academy, is here with three tips for a budget-savvy holiday.

3 Personal Finance Tips for the Holiday Season

1. Make a List of Expenses

Gifts likely make up the majority of your holiday expenses. But there are other items to account for as well. This includes cards, wrapping paper, charitable donations, shipping, and travel. If you’re buying new clothes for holiday parties or contributing food or drinks at gatherings, include those costs too.

2. Determine a Spending Limit

Determine how much you have to spend on holiday expenses after you cover your personal expenses, such as rent, groceries, utilities, transportation, etc. When determining how much you can spend on holiday goodies, try not to eat into the rest of your budget to accommodate. Most people on your gift list likely appreciate thoughtful gifts more than expensive ones anyway, Patrick Swindale advises.

3. Beware of Doorbusters

Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and a slew of “doorbuster” deals are enticing. But Patrick Swindale warns research shows at many retailers, there isn’t a significant difference between one-day promotions and regular holiday sales. Also, some shops may mark up costs before the holiday season to create the appearance of a massive markdown. Before you make costly purchases, research to determine the item’s market value and ensure you get a fair price.

More on Patrick Swindale

Patrick Swindale works full-time as an engineer at HMS Global Maritime, Inc. and maintains a 4.0 grade-point average at the Loeb School for International Business at Maine Maritime Academy where he is studying for his Masters of Science in International Logistics Management. When Patrick Swindale is not at work or in class, he spends time with his family and takes his autistic brother, of whom he is a legal guardian, to the gym or hiking five days a week.

An Eagle Scout and former assistant scoutmaster, Patrick Swindale is community-minded and spends his remaining hours giving back. He assists with his old Scout group and local charity efforts and has participated in St. John Bosco Youth Group and Knights of Columbus. Patrick Swindale is also a regular speaker at his church.

4 Best Boating Spots in Western Washington According to Patrick Swindale

Western Washington is an outdoor enthusiast’s paradise, with an abundance of natural beauty and recreational activities aplenty. While there are countless ways to enjoy the Northwest’s treasures, one of the best by far is boating. Patrick Swindale, a boating enthusiast from Lakewood, WA, shares his four favorite spots. 

4 Best Boating Destinations Near Seattle 

  1. San Juan Islands 

The San Juans are arguably Puget Sound’s most famous. The archipelago is best known for its spectacular vistas, untainted nature, and whale-watching. A hot spot for orca sightings, it’s also possible to see half a dozen other whales, dolphin, or porpoise species depending on the time of year. Each summer, boat manufacturer Bayliner hosts a boating event on San Juan Island, the largest of the islands, the perfect opportunity to meet other boating enthusiasts. To rent a boat and head to the San Juans from the mainland, drive to Anacortes or Bellingham to pick up a vessel. Ferries also reach the islands from these ports. 

  1. Vashon Island

Vashon Island, also known as the “Heart of the Sound” is known for its artsy and eclectic vibe. Reachable only by boat, it’s the ideal retreat for creatives of all types. Ashore is shopping and tasty fare aplenty, as well as a theater and print shops. The waters surrounding Vashon are equally appealing, offering lovely views of the Sound. 

  1. Poulsbo

Known as “Little Norway on the Fjord,” Poulsbo is a picturesque small town with big character. Its port was named Boater’s Choice by Marinas.com in 2018 and the bustling Front Street is lined with shops and eateries. There’s also a Sea Discovery Center, a major attraction for families. Located just 20 minutes from Seattle, Liberty Bay’s calm waters are great for casual cruising, or you can hop on to nearby destinations such as Port Townsend and Coupeville, each of which has historic charm and beautiful views of its own. 

  1. Bell Harbor Marina

Bell Harbor Marina is the only recreational marina in the city. From Bell Harbor, you can avoid Seattle’s notorious traffic jams and make your way to major attractions like Pike Place Market, the Seattle Aquarium, and all the rest downtown Seattle has to offer, including shopping and restaurants galore. The best time to visit Bell Harbor, Patrick Swindale said, is the 4th of July. You won’t get a better view of the fireworks anywhere in the city. 

More on Patrick Swindale 

Patrick Swindale works full-time as an engineer at HMS Global Maritime, Inc. and maintains a 4.0 grade-point average at the Loeb School for International Business at Maine Maritime Academy where he is studying for his Masters of Science in International Logistics Management. When he is not at work or in class, he spends time with his family and takes his autistic brother, of whom he is a legal guardian, to the gym or hiking five days a week. 

An Eagle Scout and former assistant scoutmaster, Patrick Swindale is community-minded and spends his remaining hours giving back. He assists with his old Scout group and local charity efforts and has participated in St. John Bosco Youth Group and Knights of Columbus. He is also a regular speaker at his church.

Patrick Swindale Discusses 3 Benefits of Weightlifting

Patrick Swindale’s days are long and his schedule packed, but the Lakewood, WA resident and engineer at HMS Global Maritime, Inc. who works 50 to 60-hour workweeks still makes time to hit the gym six days a week. A high school athlete involved in water polo and swim teams, his focus has shifted in recent years to weightlifting. Here, Patrick Swindale explains three major benefits of weightlifting in addition to gaining muscle mass, strength, and stamina.

Patrick Swindale (16)3 Benefits of Weightlifting

1) Strong Bones
While weight lifting is most closely associated with building muscles, strength training can also reinforce bone strength. Lifting weights involves putting the muscles under stress and allowing them to recover, resulting in improved strength and endurance over time. Likewise, lifting stimulates mineral nutrient production which increases bone density. Patrick Swindale added increased bone density is essential to reduce the risk of fractures and osteoporosis.

2) Posture
Good posture is key to safe weightlifting, Patrick Swindale said. Sloppy posture, such as slouching or leaning to the side, could result in injuries such as muscle strains or cramps. In exercises such as barbell squats, bad posture could result in even more serious issues. Being mindful of your posture while at the gym can help you get into the habit of maintaining good posture all the time. This, in turn, can reduce back, neck, and knee pain and improve spine health.

3) Mental Health
Any kind of exercise can have tremendous benefits for your mental health, Patrick Swindale said. Exercise releases endorphins, or “happy hormones” which improve your mood. Furthermore, weight lifting can reduce stress and provide an outlet for other negative emotions. Over time, studies show regular gym sessions can have a significant effect on mood disorders such as depression and anxiety. Regular exercise can also boost your confidence and energy levels.

Patrick Swindale credits his fitness regimen, which includes healthy eating and regular weightlifting, with giving him the stamina and energy he needs to power through his workday, spend time with his family and friends, and participate regularly in church and community events and causes. An Eagle Scout and former assistant scoutmaster Patrick Swindale is community-minded and still assists with his old Scout troop while also caring for his autistic younger brother, of whom he is a legal guardian. He has also participated in St. John Bosco Youth Group and Knights of Columbus, was involved in Kappa Sigma and Alpha Phi Sigma in college, and is a regular speaker at his church. If that weren’t enough, Patrick Swindale is also maintaining a 4.0 grade-point average at the Loeb School for International Business at Maine Maritime Academy where he is studying for his Masters of Science in International Logistics Management.

“I carry myself with passion for whatever job I’m committed to,” Patrick Swindale said.

College Student & Maritime Engineer, Patrick Swindale, Shares the Value of Volunteering With Catholic Charities

What does it mean to be a Christian? Although answers vary, many Christians, including Lakewood’s Patrick Swindale, will mention the importance of spreading God’s love and goodwill through compassion and charity. In addition to the countless acts of kindness individuals share with one another every day, organizations like Catholic Charities also play a pivotal role in communities around the world.

Like most religious charity organizations, Catholic Charities is a non-profit based on faith principles and doing God’s work on earth. It is a national network comprised of thousands of volunteers like Patrick Swindale operating in hundreds of cities in the U.S. It is part of Caritas Internationalis, an international federation of Catholic charity organizations.

“At Catholic Charities we help people, regardless of their faith, who are struggling with poverty and other complex issues,” says the organization website.

Catholic Charities assists in areas including disaster relief, immigrant and refugee services, affordable housing, integrated health, food and nutrition, social enterprise initiatives, advocacy and social policy initiatives, foundational services, and leadership development and Catholic identity, according to the website.

In Washington state, Patrick Swindale notes the organization has hands in a variety of social services endeavors. This includes providing temporary and semi-permanent housing for houseless individuals, food banks and soup kitchens for the hungry, healthcare for those who cannot afford medicine or medical services, and immigrant and refugee relocation and integration assistance.

In addition to his work with Catholic Charities throughout the years, Patrick Swindale is also an Eagle Scout and has participated in the St. John Bosco Youth Group and Knights of Columbus. A dedicated Christian, Patrick Swindale also lectures at his church and cares for his autistic younger sibling while working and going to college. Despite his busy schedule, Patrick Swindale says volunteering does not consume his time, but rather, it adds to his life. Giving selflessly to others, Patrick Swindale said, is a fulfilling experience like no other and the best way to represent and exemplify the Christian faith.

Quoting Corinthians 9:6-8, he said, “Remember this: Whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows generously will also reap generously. Each of you should give what you have decided in your heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.”

Engineer Patrick Swindale Exemplifies the Boy Scouts’ Value in Shaping Young Men

Since its founding in 1908 by British cavalry officer Lieutenant General Robert S.S. Baden-Powell, author of Scouting for Boys, the Boy Scout movement has been an integral part of young men’s lives, from the United Kingdom to the United States. As anyone familiar with the Scouts knows, it’s much more than a hobby or extracurricular activity. Boy Scouts is, for many, a life-changing experience. From Cub Scouts to Eagle, boys become men as they progress through the ranks, learning, growing, and improving along the way. Patrick Swindale of Lakewood, WA, is a prime example of the Boy Scouts’ positive impact.

Patrick Swindale (19)

Born in 1994 in Tacoma, WA, Patrick Swindale began participating in Boy Scouts while in grade school. In high school, in addition to his involvement in the swim and water polo teams, he achieved Eagle Scout status and served as an assistant scoutmaster. True to the Boyscouts’ commitment to community, he also participated in the St. John Bosco Youth Group and Knights of Columbus and gave his time and energy to school and community goodwill endeavors.

“I carry myself with passion for whatever job I’m committed to, put my all into team efforts and thrive in a team-oriented atmosphere,” Patrick Swindale said.

After high school, while continuing his involvement with Scouts, the burgeoning leader attended Washington State University to earn his undergraduate degree, as well as St. Martin’s University for a semester. During his time at WSU, he was a member of the Exec Board for the fraternity Kappa Sigma and treasurer and vice president for Alpha Phi Sigma, the Criminal Justice honor society. After graduating, he was accepted into the Loeb School for International Business at Maine Maritime Academy for the Masters of Science in International Logistics Management. Patrick Swindale currently maintains a 4.0 grade point average and is on course to graduate in 2021, after which he intends to become a Licensed Custom Broker.

But his academic achievements and community involvement aren’t the only ways in which Patrick Swindale upholds the Scout pledge to do his duty to God and his country, to help other people at all times, and to keep himself “physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.” Since turning 23, he has also been the legal guardian of his younger autistic brother, to ensure generational care. Patrick Swindale also works full time, typically 50 to 60 hours a week, as an engineer at HMS Ferries in Pierce County. After work, five days a week, he takes his brother to the gym and for a mile hike to benefit both siblings mentally and physically.

While these commitments are more than most young men his age take on, Patrick Swindale never slows down. Patrick Swindale also lectures at his church, participates in multiple community programs, and continues to be involved with his old Boy Scout troop, assisting and mentoring the next generation of upstanding American men.